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  HIs face tells it all

HIs face tells it all

Setting the scene

Sledding down a hill is one thing. Sledding down a mountain – is entirely something else. Who knows where the boy will land, or how he will land; it’s all up in the air. One thing is for sure, he is going for a ride.  The scene provides no indication to his landing; or if he will retain all the parts of the sled or himself.  What was he thinking before he started? His face is the only portion that gives some clue he might have pushed this stunt a little too far.

  Unique Underpainting; Defying Profectionism

Unique Underpainting; Defying Profectionism

Layout

Making the boy’s face and body large enough to capture the painting was important for the artist.  This meant keeping the mountains and other features a backdrop. No landing in site was certainly a good play. One can only imagine where the bottom is.

From the purple mountains to orange in the boots the artists tries to push as much color into the painting as possible and still keep it clear.  

The artist uses his classic un-finished under painting techniques to display all around the edges of the canvas, as shown in bits of orange, red, and yellow. He loves defying protectionism by deliberately leaving the beginning layers of a painting to show through. Notice at the signature some strong geometric lines, over the under painting. One can only imagine what those are for and how they tie into the painting, if at all. The old school sled is a nice touch.

Painting techniques

The artist utilized his 10-inch metal trowel as a paint brush for portions of the painting. The combination of the 10-inch trowel with other very small brush strokes provides the painting with a wonderful amount of contrast depth.

  Purple Mountains - Using 10-inch Trowel

Purple Mountains - Using 10-inch Trowel